DO THIS: One and One

I overheard a conversation about New Years resolutions last week. In it the guys were talking about long lists of New Years resolutions. And I of course was thinking about my own. But then for some reason a snippet from Milan Kundera quote popped into my head “there are only two ways to define the self: addition and subtraction.” That has always rung true to me. I switch between addition and subtraction. When the to do lists get too long often I will simplify it to just one of each. Out of all the possible things I could do (addition) and not do (subtraction), what is the most impactful one of each I tan think of for this project? For 2019 mine are

Add: more personal time with my employees at upgrade labs

Subtract: poker

My character strengths

One of my favorite tools of self analysis is the via character strength profile . I hear a lot of advice (which i agree with) that people should play to their strengths and not avoid their fears. But what are my strengths ? Character strengths? This tool tells you. My top six are Creativity, love of learning, perspective, honesty, perseverance (resilience), and judgement. Pretty much straight up ceo stuff. That makes sense.

The Stoics understood Quantum Physics and the Universal Field

The more I read the Stoics, the more I agree with the general approach to life.  I am also fascinated that, without the aide of much science, they got so many things right.  We now know through Quantum Physics that everything is some form of energy wave. We are all made of the same stuff, just vibrating at different frequencies so some appear solid, some fluid, some alive, some dead, etc.  Modern quantified spirituality guys like Dr. Joe Dispenza call it the “Universal Field”.  I have no idea what it is, but the Stoics, and Marcus, in particular, nailed it.  Basically, we are all connected, made of the same stuff.  So remember that when you get tilted by someone.  A part of them is you and vice versa.  Would you be so tilted at yourself?

Answer the moral machine honestly

I just answered the Moral Machine self driving car scenarios and i did it honestly unlike it seems most respondents. This is one of the artifacts of surveys like this. The issue comes down to what reference point are you applying to your answer? When asked “moral dilemmas” most people try to answer what they think others want to hear, they take the “what if my answer were published in the New York Times?” Approach, typically choosing whatever is politically popular today. That is why in this survey the average respondent to the “protect passengers” questions are exactly in the middle. Indifferent. Yet is everyone really indifferent?

To combat this bias I took the purposeful approach of answering the question not as if were some theoretical car with theoretical people. I decided to answer as if it were my car with my family in it and I didn’t know the animals or pedestrians. That is the 99.9% real life scenario. When I buy a self driving car I want it to have variables that I can configure on these kinds of things. And I for one will set it to always protect me and my family. When researchers ask the question this way (your family in the car) they in fact find that there is a significant preference to protect the passengers.

When reading these kinds of survey results. Always ask yourself it the designers considered the frame of reference correctly and if you were in the car with your children would you answer differently

Martin talks to TA McCann about how to live to 200

My friend TA McCann just started a new podcast, How to Live to 200.  I was one of his first guests.  We talk about how I got sucked into the Biohacking world, some of the quantified ways I have gotten younger over the last year, and a few peeks into the crystal ball on upgrades coming down the pipe for the rest of us.

DO THIS: Stoic tasks to fill the time

Today from Daily Stoic, came a list of tasks which I am finding useful.  When you have half an hour, pick up one of these and do it.  It will build character.

[*] Throw away or give away stuff you have but don’t use anymore.

[*] Skip a meal. You’ll be fine. Remember what hunger feels like.

[*] See if you can go an hour without talking.

[*] Wear your worst clothes out. See how little anyone cares.

[*] Don’t read. Don’t do anything. Just sit there.

[*] Throw a rock up in the air. Watch it go up and watch it go down. (This is a metaphor.)

[*] Find something you’re not good at and practice being better at it. Write with your non-dominant hand, etc.

[*] If today was your last day on earth, who would you thank? Thank them. Who would you apologize to? Apologize to them. Who would you cherish? Cherish them.

[*] Take a walk.

[*] Think of the worst thing someone has ever done to you. Now say to yourself, “I forgive you.”

[*] Step outside tonight and just look up at the stars.